There is no standing down when it comes to sexual misconduct in the Canadian Army (video)

Video / November 15, 2016 / Project number: 16-0007

 

(Fade in to a PowerPoint presentation projected onto a screen with the words “Unit Ethics Coordinator’s Course: Inappropriate Sexual Behavior. Operation HONOUR”)

(Cut to scene of Major Craig Gardner teaching the Unit Ethics Coordinator’s Course to soldiers sitting around a desk.  A PowerPoint presentation on projected on a screen behind him)

 (Major Gardner speaking to the class) I think if somebody says a racist joke at the workplace, probably somebody is going to call them on it.  I think sexism is alive and well.  If racism isn’t okay, why is sexism okay in how we operate?

(On screen text: Major Craig Gardner, Canadian Army Ethics Officer)

(Cut to close up of Major Craig Gardner in front of a brick building speaking on camera) The ethics training I give is to anybody from the rank of master corporal and up. 

What I normally have are warrant officers to captains and majors on the course.  And, they will provide the function of unit ethics coordinator within their specific unit that they operate in. 

(Cut to scene of Major Craig Gardner teaching the Unit Ethics Coordinator’s Course to soldiers)

 (Voiceover) I had a two day seminar so I added a third day to the course. I spend about six hours conducting an awareness session on the sexual misconduct and inappropriate sexual behaviour within the Canadian Army.

(Cut to close up of Major Craig Gardner in front of a brick building speaking on camera) It works out nicely when I talk about personal conduct and when I talk about ethical behaviour and the work I do from the perspective of battlefield ethics and how behaviour gets influenced by the environment and the situation that people work in.  It just dovetails nicely with the first two days of my seminar.

(Cut to scene of Major Craig Gardner teaching the Unit Ethics Coordinator’s Course to soldiers)

(Major Gardner speaking to the class) It’s not political correctness run amok.  It’s that culture, that sexualized culture that we’ve somehow created within our institution.  We just got to give ourselves a little jolt to get ourselves out of that.

(Voiceover) It was very important to add.  It is something we have to talk about.  When I run my seminars, it’s a very interactive course.  A lot of people want to talk about it.

Once you can open the door to discussion and dialogue, that’s where we can get a lot of things done.

Leadership is a key for ethics discussions.  And, when I train these individuals to go back to their units, I make it very clear to them – it’s about them enabling their leadership and enabling that command team to go out and talk about ethics or sexual misconduct.

(Cut to close up of Major Craig Gardner in front of a brick building speaking on camera) If we are going to change our culture in any way, shape, or form, we got to impact the climate itself to force that culture change.  So, focusing on the soldiers and the leadership and talking about this will help change that.

(Fade to black with Canadian Army tagline “Strong. Proud. Ready.”  in the centre of the screen.  The Canadian Army visual identifier is in the bottom right corner)

(Fade to National Defence wordmark with copyright information: Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2016)

(Fade to Canada wordmark)

(Fade to black)

 

 

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