Patrols of the 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group

The 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group is responsible for the area of Northern Ontario. Its patrols are located throughout the sparsely populated northern and isolated areas of the province.

Some of their duties include conducting surveillance patrol exercises, assisting with domestic operations and providing support to the arctic response company group. Rangers from the 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group regularly train in activities such as first aid, ground search and rescue, leadership, navigation and weaponry.

Attawapiskat

The Attawapiskat Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1998 and currently has 20 Canadian Rangers on strength. Attawapiskat has a population of 1300 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52° 55' 59" N latitude, 82° 24' 00" W longitude, 7 km west of James Bay on the banks of the Attawapiskat River. Attawapiskat is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. The location of the town has been a gathering place for local Native people for centuries. Originally it was a seasonal camp that was visited in the spring and summer to take advantage of the prime fishing on one of the main drainage rivers of James Bay. Access to Attawapiskat for most of the year is mainly limited to flight. During the winter months a "Winter Road" is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.

The Mishkeegogamang Patrol

The Mishkeegogamang Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2003 and currently has 13 Canadian Rangers on strength. Mishkeegogamang is an Ojibwa First Nation community with a population of 1500 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located on Highway 599 approximately 50 km south of Pickle Lake, ON at 51° 03' 54" N latitude, 90° 16' 23" W longitude. Mishkeegogamang is made up of separate communities several km apart. The main reserve accommodates the sub-communities of Bottle Hill, Poplar Heights and Sandy Road. A smaller portion of the reserve, just to the north, called Ten Houses is also part of the reserve. Mishkeegogamang is one of only 2 communities within 3 CRPG’s Area of Operations that is accessible by road year round.

The Bearskin Lake Patrol

The Bearskin Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1994 and currently has 24 Canadian Rangers on strength. Bearskin Lake has a population of 425 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is an Oji-Cree First Nation community located 425 north of Sioux Lookout, ON at 53° 54' 58" N latitude, 90° 58' 19" W longitude. Three settlements make up the Bearskin Lake First Nation. Originally located on Bearskin Lake, their main community moved to its present site, on Michikan Lake, in the 1930s. The main settlement is accessible only by air except for a few months between January and March when a seasonal winter road allows vehicle access to the Northern Ontario highway system. The main village is situated on the west shore of the lake and all three communities are interconnected by gravel roadways.

The Moose Factory Patrol

The Moose Factory Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1994 and currently has 30 Canadian Rangers on strength. Moose Factory has a population of 2400 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 51° 26' 03" N latitude, 80° 59' 73" W longitude, 20 km west of the southern west tip of James Bay. Moose Factory is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. It was originally a fur trading post set up by the Hudson Bay Company in the late 1670s. Moose Factory is an Island across the Moose River from the mainland town of Moosonee, ON. It is accessible through rail from Cochrane, ON to Moosonee and by air year-round. Many of the community members still maintain their traditional ways by hunting and fishing.

The Constance Lake Patrol

The Constance Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1995 and currently has 25 Canadian Rangers on strength. Constance Lake has a population of 700 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is an Oji-Cree community located 35kms west of Hearst, ON just North of Highway 11 at 49° 48' 43" N latitude, 87° 07' 44" W longitude. Constance Lake is a progressive and active community that encourages, supports and promotes local business development, job creation and economic development. Constance Lake is accessible by road year round. Constance Lake reserve lands total 7686 acres. Wild life is abundant and includes moose, rabbit, beaver, muskrat and mink as well as several species of fish within the nearby rivers.

The Muskrat Dam Patrol

The Muskrat Dam Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2002 and currently has 20 Canadian Rangers on strength. Muskrat Dam has a population of 385 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53° 21' 43" N latitude, 91° 50' 49" W longitude 400kms north of Thunder Bay, ON. Muskrat Dam is home to Oji-Cree First Nation residence that has lived in the area for centuries. The community is very resourceful owning and operating its own sawmill. Travel to Muskrat Dam is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.

The Eabametoong or Fort Hope Patrol

The Eabametoong or Fort Hope Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2009 and currently has 32 Canadian Rangers on strength. Eabametoong is an Ojibwa First Nation community with a population of 1300 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 51° 33' 43" N latitude, 87° 54' 28" W longitude, on the shores of Eabamet Lake in the Albany River system. The community is approximately 240 km north of Beardmore and is accessible by air, water or winter roads. Eabametoong came to be during the fur trade era when the Hudson’s Bay Company set up a trading post on Eabamet Lake in 1890. The Fort Hope Band came into existence in 1905 when the treaty was signed. The new community of Eabametoong started in 1982 with the official name of Eabametoong First Nation being adopted in 1985.

The Neskantaga Patrol

The Neskantaga Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2003 and currently has 21 Canadian Rangers on strength. Neskantaga has a population of 320 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52° 19' 29" N latitude, 88° 02' 10" W longitude, 560 km north of Thunder Bay ON. Neskantaga is home to the Ojibway First Nation. Members of the community were hunters and gatherers and this tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game such as Moose, Caribou and Rabbit, among others, is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Neskantaga is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.

The Fort Albany Patrol

The Fort Albany Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1998 and currently has 33 Canadian Rangers on strength. Fort Albany First Nation has a population of 900 and falls within the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52° 15' 04" N latitude, 81° 30' 04" W longitude, 10 kms west of James Bay on the Southern Banks of the Albany River. Fort Albany is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. Old Fort Albany, located 5kms east of the new location, was originally established in 1670 as a Fur trading post by the Hudson’s Bay Company. Travel to Fort Albany is limited to flight most of the year. During the winter months a “Winter Road” is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.

The Peawanuck Patrol

The Peawanuck Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1994 and currently has 12 Canadian Rangers on strength. Peawanuck has a population of 200 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 55° 00' 30" N latitude, 85° 25' 20" W longitude, 35 km up stream from Hudson Bay on the banks of the Winisk River. Peawanuck is a Cree First Nation community. The people of Peawanuck were hunters and gatherers and this tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Peawanuck is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to Fort Severn, ON and into Manitoba.

The Fort Severn Patrol

The Fort Severn Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1998 and currently has 27 Canadian Rangers on strength. Fort Severn has a population of 400 people and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It has the distinction of being Ontario’s most northern community. Fort Severn is located 8 km south of Hudson Bay along the banks of the Severn River at 56° 00' 37" N latitude, 87° 34' 07" W longitude. Fort Severn was established by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1689. Originally the reserve was placed in the Rocksand area at the junction of the Severn and Sachigo Rivers. In 1973, the reserve was relocated to its current location. Travel to Fort Severn is limited to flight year-round. During the winter months a “Winter Road” is constructed that links the community to Shamattawa, Man to the Southwest and Peawanuck, ON to the Southeast.

The Sachigo Lake Patrol

The Sachigo Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1994 and currently has 25 Canadian Rangers on strength. Sachigo Lake has a population of 450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53° 53' 38" N latitude, 92° 09' 43" W longitude approximately 425 km north of Sioux Lookout, ON. Sachigo Lake is an Oji-Cree community. The people of Sachigo Lake were hunters and gatherers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Travel to Sachigo Lake is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.

The Kasabonika Lake Patrol

The Kasabonika Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2009 and currently has 48 Canadian Rangers on strength. Kasabonika Lake First Nation is an Oji-Cree First Nation community with a population of 900 residents. It is located at 53° 31' 29" N latitude, 88° 38' 35" W Longitude, 517 km north of Sioux Lookout, Ontario. There are no roads into the community and the only access is by air. It is part of the Shibogama First Nations Council and the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The Kasabonika Lake reserve is a member of Treaty No 9. The community moved to its present site in 1962 and achieved full reserve status on January 13, 1976. Kasabonika Lake First Nation was a satellite community of the Big Trout Lake Band until formal separation occurred on January 13, 1976.

The Sandy Lake Patrol

The Sandy Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1995 and currently has 30 Canadian Rangers on strength. Sandy Lake First Nation has a population of 2450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 53° 04' 26" N latitude, 93° 19' 33" W longitude, 500 km Northwest of Thunder Bay, ON. Sandy Lake is home to Oji-Cree First Nation residence that has lived in the area for centuries. The people of Sandy Lake were hunters and gatherers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Sandy Lake is accessible only by air except for a few months between January and March when a seasonal winter road allows vehicle access to the Northern Ontario highway system.

The Kashechewan Patrol

The Kashechewan Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2001 and currently has 26 Canadian Rangers on strength. Kashechewan has population of 1200 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52° 15' 29" N latitude, 81° 39' 08" W longitude, 10 km west of James Bay on the Northern banks of the Albany River. Kashechewan is home to the Mushkego or Omushkego James Bay Cree. Kashechewan has numerous species of large and small game. The local population utilizes this resource to continue with their traditional hunting and trapping ways. Travel to Kashechewan is limited to flight most of the year. During the winter months a “Winter Road” is constructed that connects the community to other coastal towns on the James Bay coast.

The North Caribou Lake Patrol

The North Caribou Lake Patrol was established in 2012 and has 18 Canadian Rangers on strength. North Caribou Lake First Nation is an Oji-Cree community and has a total population of 928 (January 2008). It falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario and is located approximately 320 km north of Sioux Lookout at 52° 47' 56.4" N Latitude and 90° 44' 20.4" W Longitude. A member of the Windigo First Nation Council and Nishnawbe-Aski Nation, North Caribou Lake has year round accessibility by air only. Although North Caribou Lake is the official registered name of the community, the nation is located on Weagamow Lake, thus also known as Weagamow First Nation or by literal translation of the Oji-Cree word Wiyaagamaa – Round Lake.

The Kingfisher Lake Patrol

The Kingfisher Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2010 and currently has 30 Canadian Rangers on strength. Kingfisher Lake, an Oji-Cree community, has a population of 500 and is located at 53° 00' 45" N latitude, 89° 51' 19" W Longitude, north of Sioux Lookout, Ontario. Travel to Kingfisher Lake is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to the Northern, ON highway system. In 1808 the Hudson's Bay Company established an outpost at Big Beaver House, which is located approximately 12 km southwest of the present Kingfisher Lake reserve. Big Beaver House was frequented by Kingfisher Lake people for trading fur and community activities.

The Wapekeka Patrol

Wapekeka is a detachment of the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Patrol, was formed in 2011, and has a strength of 5. Wapekeka First Nation consists of two Reserves with two Addendums in 1996 and 1997. Wapekeka First Nation Reserves is located 26 km (16 miles) Northwest of Big Trout Lake and 451 km ( 282 Miles) Northeast of Sioux Lookout. The latitude and longitude of the reserve is 53° 49' N and 89° 22' W. The reserve size is 5566 hectares or 23 square miles with an additional 44 hectares added in 1996 and 1997 and Claim of additional 20 square miles. The community is accessible year round since The Ministry of Transportation constructed a 1070 x 30 m airstrip in 1991. Wapekeka community year-round population is 363. The main language spoken in Wapekeka represents a mixture of Cree and Ojibway (Oji-Cree). As in most northern communities, the younger people along with a portion of the older residents speak English comfortably as a Second Language.

The Kitchenuhmaykoosib Patrol

The Kitchenuhmaykoosib Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2001 and currently has 26 Canadian Rangers on strength. Kitchenuhmaykoosib, also known as Big Trout Lake or KI, has a population of 1325 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. Kitchenuhmaykoosib is an Oji-Cree First Nation community located 580 km north of Thunder Bay, ON, on Big Trout Lake. It can be found at 53° 82' 03" N latitude, 89° 70' 03" W longitude. Kitchenuhmaykoosib has numerous species of large and small game. The local population utilizes this resource to continue with their traditional hunting and trapping ways. KI is accessible only by air except for the winter months between late January and late March. During this period a seasonal winter road links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.

The Webequie Patrol

The Webequie Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2002 and currently has 29 Canadian Rangers on strength. Webequie has a population of 450 and falls within the Kenora District of Northern Ontario. It is located at 52° 59' 06" N latitude, 87° 16' 56" W longitude, approximately 540 km north of Thunder Bay, ON. Webequie is an Ojibway community. The people of Webequie were hunters and gatherers and the tradition of living off the land continues. Wild game is still a staple in the diets of many people. Webequie is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road” links the community to the Northern, ON highway system.

The Lac Seul Patrol

The Lac Seul Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2011 and currently has 28 Canadian Rangers on strength. Lac Seul, an Ojibway community has a total population of approximately 800 located in three separate settlements; Kejick Bay, Whitefish Bay and Frenchmen’s Head. Frenchmen’s Head, which house’s the main Band Office and the Lac Seul Police Services is located at 50° 14' 42" N 92° 19' 41" W or about 40 km north west of Sioux Lookout. Lac Seul Reserve is the oldest reserve in the Sioux Lookout District of INAC. The lake was the main transportation route and an important source of food. In 1929 Ontario Hydro constructed a dam at Ear Falls to produce Hydro electricity. Lac Seul Lake was flooded and to this day, the Ear Falls Dam controls the lake level. The flooding caused the area known as Kejick Bay to become an island, permanently separated from the mainland and splitting the community into two parts. The community of Whitefish Bay is located on the mainland.

The Wunnumin Lake First Nation Patrol

Wunnumin Lake First Nation is a detachment of the Kingfisher Lake Patrol and is situated within the Sioux Lookout district at Latitude 53° N Longitude 89° W, 360 km northeast of Sioux Lookout. It opened in 2011 and has a Canadian Ranger strength of 9. Wunnumin Lake reserve has been divided into two sections of allotted land. The current inhabited land consists of 5855 hectares (22.61 square miles) and then uninhabited land containing 3797 hectares (14.66 square miles) is located several km east, on the southern shores of Wunnumin Lake. The Band membership of Wunnumin Lake First Nation is currently 489 residents. The first language of Wunnumin Lake people is a combination of Ojibway and Cree, known as Oji-Cree. It is estimated that over half of the population can speak English language fluently, but the native language is permanently established in the community. The community can be accessed primarily through air transportation, however during certain seasons one can also travel to this community using the winter trails, winter road system or waterways. Wunnumin Lake and surrounding areas has a large variety of wildlife, aquatic life and forest vegetation. These resources have benefited the local residents both personally and commercially.

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